3 Logo Design Case Studies from LogoLounge 9

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T5462-1 (1)Editor’s Note:
The following case studies are excerpted from LogoLounge 9 by Bill Gardner and Emily Potts. LogoLounge 9 presents the 2,000 best logo designs as judged by a select group of identity designers and branding experts. Logos are organized into 20 visual categories for easy reference. Find it in MyDesignShop


3 Logo Design Case Studies from LogoLounge 9

Artillery Drums Crest

Designer /// Joe White

Client /// Artillery Drums

Category /// Crests

artillery-drums5Artillery Drums is a drum manufacturer in the United Kingdom, processing military grade metals into top range drums. They hired Joe White of Ye Olde Studio in London to create a logo design and emblem for their product. “The main idea for this brand was to create something in line with the industry, but also show a military theme,” White says.

White did several hand-lettering samples for the client to choose from.

White did several hand-lettering samples for the client to choose from.

“When I’m asked to produce a brand, often a crest will be a part of this, along with many other elements. I often refer to my designs as badges or emblems.”

Artillery Drums wanted the full monty with this brand—custom lettering and an emblem similar to a military insignia. “They wanted a custom typeface to distinguish their company from the others and work well as a logotype without any exterior decorations or symbols,” he notes. He produced several custom typefaces, each referencing a heavy metal music style, for the client to choose from, along with four different design directions.

Taking his initial lettering samples, White did some preliminary logo designs, mixing and matching type styles to see what would work with each design.

Taking his initial lettering samples, White did some preliminary logo designs, mixing and matching type styles to see what would work with each design.

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Here he focused on trademarks for Artillery Drums.

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“In the final stages, I also produced a detailed badge along with several other branding elements. Some of the elements are a little worn, where as others are much cleaner,” White notes. “This allows the company to dress up or dress down to suit any event or product without losing sight of the original brand.”

There are two versions of the final crest logos, which can be used in either white (seen here) or black (seen above). On the detailed, letterpress-printed logo, the drum sticks emerge from the top and bottom of the crest.There are two versions of the final crest logos, which can be used in either white (seen here) or black (seen above). On the detailed, letterpress-printed logo, the drum sticks emerge from the top and bottom of the crest.


Biovideo Logo

Designer /// Anagrama

Client /// Biovideo

Category /// Art

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Biovideo is a video service that captures the first precious moments of a baby’s life from birth to first cuddles and kisses with parents and family members. Its founder, Carlos Villaseñor, founded the company after the birth of his first daughter, when he, himself was faced with the difficult choice of either videotaping his daughter’s birth or holding his wife’s hand. He decided that’s a choice no parent should ever have to make, and thus, Biovideo was born.

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He hired Anagrama, based in Mexico City, Mexico, to develop the brand identity for Biovideo. Anagrama is a multidisciplinary firm known for its adventurous use of color, typography and scale in its branding of several boutique shops in Monterrey. Anagrama cofounder, Sebastian Padilla, recalls, “The client was very clear about wanting an icon for the brand, so the first task was to sit down and think about the right way to approach this project.”

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Villaseñor wanted a symbol that could be placed on different products associated with Biovideo, such as diapers and baby toys. The designers came up with an obvious, albeit clever, visual concept.

Read more about Anagrama’s work in the Fall 2015 Issue of HOW Magazine, or check out their work here.


Nike Women’s Marathon in San Francisco

Designer /// Dana Tanamachi

Client /// Nike

Category /// Calligraphy

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Nike wanted to commemorate the 2013 Nike Women’s Marathon in San Francisco with a special identity program to celebrate the marathon’s tenth anniversary. To give the marks a distinguished, handmade look, Nike design director Emily Duell hired Dana Tanamachi as the artist-in-residence for the campaign. Tanamachi’s hand-drawn style has a definitively bold yet elegant aesthetic, perfect for the event.

The We Run enclosure had to encompass several elements related to San Francisco, the 2013 Nike Women’s Marathon host city. Tanamachi elegantly captured these elements within the circular enclosure.

The We Run enclosure had to encompass several elements related to San Francisco, the 2013 Nike Women’s Marathon host city. Tanamachi elegantly captured these elements within the circular enclosure.

The design brief had several objectives, including: to encourage and inspire, to celebrate accomplishments, to be authentic, to be youthful, and to be local to San Francisco. With these goals in mind, Tanamachi first started drawing the “We Run” logo in pencil. “I did a few rough sketches, a bit blockier with the words stacked like wood type,” she says.

The We Run logotype is used by itself for merchandise, printed over a female runner silhouette, illustrated by Hiroshi Tanabe. The fl uidity and movement of the runner work seamlessly with the logotype, capturing the essence of the event. Even the Nike swoosh perfectly fl ows with the design.

The We Run logotype is used by itself for merchandise, printed over a female runner silhouette, illustrated by Hiroshi Tanabe. The fluidity and movement of the runner work seamlessly with the logotype, capturing the essence of the event. Even the Nike swoosh perfectly flows with the design.

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“I then drew the logotype on a swash baseline so it moves from low to high, showing forward movement, positive thinking and fluidity. There are a ton of hills in San Francisco so the upward movement is a nod to that.”

The lettering was accompanied by cityscape illustrations that captured the essence of the city with the iconic Golden Gate Bridge, rocks, cliffs and waves. “Nike wanted the illustration to tell a story within this enclosure. I have a collection of books on circular Japanese ornamental designs that I referred to when developing these vignettes. You can see the Japanese influence in the waves and sky, but I also tried to incorporate modern elements such as the geometric rocks and a bridge made from almost tribal shapes,” Tanamachi says.

In keeping with the forward movement of the other logotypes, Tanamachi incorporated the upward swoosh below the script for the secondary type. She used her own handwriting as the basis for the script, though she embellished the capitals.

In keeping with the forward movement of the other logotypes, Tanamachi incorporated the upward swoosh below the script for the secondary type. She used her own handwriting as the basis for the script, though she embellished the capitals.

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Nike also asked Tanamachi to design a separate Nike Women’s logo that would be used on signage and promotions for the event. In contrast to the bold, blockier We Run logo, Nike wanted a more elegant script style for this logo. Duell says, “Dana did an excellent job creating a variety of different branding elements that provided us with a robust toolkit. She helped create an aesthetic that felt feminine and relevant and brought a fresh look to the race series.”


Read more about these projects and check out 2,000 more of the best logos in the world in LogoLounge 9.

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