Designers Respond to the New Google Logo Design

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What do you think of the new Google logo? Most love it, some hate it. Either way, it’s the company’s biggest logo design overhaul in 16 years.

video via design.google.com

According to Google’s design blog, the company sought to address the following challenges with the redesign:

  • A scalable mark that could convey the feeling of the full logotype in constrained spaces.

  • The incorporation of dynamic, intelligent motion that responded to users at all stages of an interaction.

  • A systematic approach to branding in our products to provide consistency in people’s daily encounters with Google.

  • A refinement of what makes us Googley, combining the best of the brand our users know and love with thoughtful consideration for how their needs are changing.

Do you think the redesign accomplished these goals?

animated-google

We asked our network of creative professionals what they thought of the logo overhaul. The opinions were widely varied, but many of them offered interesting insights into the importance of a strong logo and the process of recreating an existing brand for such a large company.

Designers & Creatives Respond to the New Google Logo

Commentary from Lippincott:

“Google’s new logo is elegantly simple but still maintains the fun and playful quality of the original design.  It speaks to the future potential as well as the current functionalities of the Google brand. The four dots are really beautifully choreographed to communicate with us ‘human beings’ — it is actually pretty magical and 100% universal. The design and precise craftsmanship show a great depth of intelligence and restraint not typical of these types of evolutionary programs. Super well done.” — Connie Birdsall, Senior Partner, Creative Director, Lippincott

Commentary from Siegel+Gale:

“Google’s new logo is an exciting move for the company. The new, simplified look has a similar aesthetic to Google’s parent company, Alphabet, signifying their shared purpose and offerings.

Further, the revamped logo makes Google accessible for users across different platforms while maintaining the integrity of the classic Google design. While Google was once solely perceived as a search engine, it now represents much more to users in their daily lives. In contrast to the previous logo which worked best on desktop, Google’s new look is optimized for mobile — a critical component as users become increasingly mobile-first.” — Mei Wing Chan, Director of Design for Global Strategic Branding Firm Siegel+Gale

Commentary from HOW’s social networks:

Designers, creatives and other readers on Facebook and Twitter provided some fascinating perspectives and insights on the new logo design:

 

“Does it come with little magnets on the back so I can put it on my fridge? I am pretty sure my kids owned a set of those….” – Sondra Whitesell Fowler

“I think it’s relevant, adequate, appropriate. It fits in nicely with the Google design ethos, a philosophy of minimal yet friendly semi-invisible design. It’s not supposed to be taking home any graphic design awards. Good job!” – Bjørn Edvard Torbo

“There is no design to it. I don’t consider simply re-typing it in a new font, ‘designing’. As well it’s harsher on the eyes, despite it being a typically friendlier font. Some times it’s better to stick with your image. What’s next, the Nike Swoosh going gothic?” – Christian Leatham

“I’m uncomfortable [with the redesign]. I mean it’s sleek but it’s like seeing your punky goth friend turn into a prep.” – Kye Francis

“This is a good branding effort and more in line with the rest of the Google family of products — the new Inbox app, etc. The Google doodle today ties it in well with the larger brand. People saying it just looks like a font… that’s what most wordmarks are; a custom font that often looks similar to an existing font. Doesn’t make it ‘not designed.’ My only concern is that it looks too 2015… and it might look dated in 10 years. We’ll see.” – Abbi Page

“The playful colors have always been nice but this font & weigh are weak. It’s a downgrade.” – Milbery Perez-Valdes

“I like the multi-coloured G and dots but I liked the Catull-based letters better than this new typeface.” – Kelaine Devine

Want to join the conversation? Let us know what you think of the design in the comments below, or reach out to us on Facebook and Twitter!


WebA logo is one of the most important aspects of any business, and most designers have spent a fair share of time creating effective, cool logo designs for clients. HOW Logo Design Competition & Awards began in 2008 and quickly erupted as a prestigious contest that recognizes great logo design. Learn more and enter!

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