But, I Don’t Know How to Price It

Shannon FaganOver the years, I’ve developed a collective resource for image license pricing advice.  Here’s a list of some of my favorites, from the theoretical to the pragmatic.  Take them as a seed start for investigations on pricing, and also with a grain of salt.  When pricing complicated assignments and licenses, I often refer to multiple sources at once.

Negotiating Stock Photo Prices by Jim Pickerell and Cheryl Pickerell DiFrank
http://www.jimpickerell.com/guide.asp
An all-time favorite of mine for the strategies associated with developing a pricing structure in photography.

“Fighting China’s Pirates” Wall Street Journal Article by Owen Fletcher. (Find it here.) It’s interesting to learn how China is handling pricing relative to the rest of the world market.

Getty Images
www.gettyimages.com
Corbis
www.corbis.com
These two offer easy to use drop down menus which give an idea of how pricing is being assessed, and licenses written, in the traditional sector of the market.

iStockphoto
www.istockphoto.com
Dreamstime
www.dreamstime.com
Fotolia
www.fotolia.com
These three are all great sites to observe for how micro prices are handled.

Shutterstock
www.shutterstock.com
Microstock’s main subscription service

PLUS
http://www.useplus.com/
Great resource for licensing standards, even if not directly related to pricing.

Photography Agents
They can be a great resource for current and accepted pricing practices.  Agents generally will take on a complicated pricing scheme for an upfront fee or percentage of the job.

What’s missing from this list? Let us know or add it in the comments.

Over the years, I’ve developed a collective resource for image license pricing advice. Here’s a list of some of my favorites, from the theoretical to the pragmatic. Take them as a seed start for investigations on pricing, and also with a grain of salt. When pricing complicated assignments and licenses, I often refer to multiple sources at once.

Negotiating Stock Photo Prices by Jim Pickerell and Cheryl Pickerell DiFrank

http://www.jimpickerell.com/guide.asp

An all-time favorite of mine for the strategies associated with developing a pricing structure in photography.

“Fighting China’s Pirates” Wall Street Journal Article by Owen Fletcher http://tinyurl.com/3xxeo2q

It’s interesting to learn how China is handling pricing relative to the rest of the world market.

Getty Images

www.gettyimages.com

Corbis

www.corbis.com

Easy to use drop down menus which give an idea of how pricing is being assessed, and licenses written, in the traditional sector of the market.

iStockphoto

www.istockphoto.com

Dreamstime

www.dreamstime.com

Fotolia

www.fotolia.com

Great sites to observe for how micro prices are handled.

Shutterstock

www.shutterstock.com

Microstock’s main subscription service

PLUS

http://www.useplus.com/

Great resource for licensing standards, even if not directly related to pricing.

Photography Agents

They can be a great resource for current and accepted pricing practices. Agents generally will take on a complicated pricing scheme for an upfront fee or percentage of the job.

3 thoughts on “But, I Don’t Know How to Price It

  1. David Brabyn

    What’s missing from this post is a warning to freelance photographers that the microstock logic – and prices – is fundamentally incompatible with the notion of a professional freelance photographer’s livelihood.

    Microstock is a race to the bottom that only benefits the agency that aggregates sales. By licensing normal usage rights at micro rates, they are taking advantage of photographers’ naivety and accelerate the catastrophic devaluing of stock imagery.

    Frankly I am surprised microstock is featured at all on this blog without a big red warning sign.

    1. Bob Davies

      Very handy post Shannon thanks, I used a couple of these when I licensed some images recently, though I didn’t know about Jim’s guide or UsePlus, very helpful cheers 🙂

      Oh, and David, I make a fair income from Microstock considering the time I put in. It’s a much more complex marketplace than you make it sound, imho it has a lot of value to professional photographers willing to use it right.

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