McDonald’s Branding Strategy with New “Unbranded” Ads

You know you’ve made it big when you are referred to by only one name. But what about a product that needs no name or text? The new McDonald’s ads are part of what has been called an “unbranded” campaign by TBWA Paris. Their branding strategy was to remove the branding, well, most of it.  These new ads limit the use of the Mickey D’s trademark logo. Instead, the campaign focuses on showing the iconic images of foods that the fast food chain has become known for, such as the Big Mac.mcdonaldsad1

The iconic images are meant to stand alone, without text, focusing only on the food. But, could another brand do this? Are these food items and their packaging (such as the French fries pictured above), so recognizable as the McDonald’s brand that there is no need for the logo? TWBA explained that they decided to only use the images:

Because when a product speaks for itself, what more could we possibly say? But moreover, why should we say anything else?

mcdonaldsad2We’ve seen other types of creative branding strategies, and they do create a buzz. TWBA also created 3 videos that are a bit ridiculous following the same “no branding” ideas. Here’s the “yoga” ad:

Regardless of your feeling about McDonald’s food, it is interesting that their food products alone have become such a big part of the branding that no logo is needed. What do you think? Are you lovin’ it?

 

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One thought on “McDonald’s Branding Strategy with New “Unbranded” Ads

  1. Lizanne

    I think that some understanding of what comprises a brand is lacking for this writer to refer to this as “unbranded.” The style of the photos, the packaging, the coloring, the jingle … these are ALL brand aspects. All that was left out was the logo … until the end. And since chicken nuggets are available at home and in most restaurants (especially for kids), had they not used the logo at the end of the yoga ad, I would not have been certain this was McDonald’s.

    Snickers played the same “let’s not show our name or full logo” game and it worked better than this. And it was so subtle in its application that it did what this campaign should have achieved … it should have REINFORCED brand recognition.

    I think the intial thought behind this campaign was good but it was poorly fleshed-out and poorly executed.

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