Sniper Vs. Shotgun

To explain their design process, Atlanta-based Matchstic recently created a PDF showing the difference between a shotgun and sniper approach to branding. The basic differences are:

The Shotgun:
• SHOT QUICKLY WITHOUT MUCH PLANNING
• RELEASES WIDE SPREAD OF PELLETS, HOPING FOR A HIT
• THE LEARNING CURVE IS LOW, EASY TO START SHOOTING
• THERE CAN BE COLLATERAL DAMAGE
• PRODUCES SOME SUCCESS, SOME OF THE TIME

The Sniper:
• MUCH TIME SPENT PLANNING AND SETTING UP THE SHOT
• TAKES ONE SHOT TO HIT THE TARGET
• THE LEARNING CURVE IS HIGH, REQUIRES PRACTICE
• THERE IS A LOW RANGE OF ERROR
• VERY FEW PEOPLE BECOME SNIPERS

Which do you think is more effective?

Posted by Megan

0 thoughts on “Sniper Vs. Shotgun

  1. Todd Miechiels

    Sniper marketing is clearly the way to go if you’re looking to maximize return on advertising spend. The internet rewards snipers and penalizes shotgun marketers, which is why Madison Avenue is dying a slow death and nano-agencies and disciplined marketers are eating their lunch.

    There should be a rally cry in the marketing world to throw the shotgun marketers to the curb and reward sniper marketers.

    Awesome paper, I love the Matchstic crew.

  2. Brian Keith

    Having actually been a real-live sniper in the USMC I have a bit of a bias. I’ve always felt a surgical approach was best. However, I must also say that you must pick the weapon/method that best suits the situation.

    While sniping ensures a high hit probability it is also a slow, methodical, and potentially expensive process. The tools a sniper uses are specifically adapted for the purpose of engaging high-value/high-priority targets at great range. These tools and techniques are applied by highly trained professionals who eat, sleep, and dream sniping. Another consideration is that if you expend all of your time & effort on that one well-aimed shot will you have missed your window of opportunity and/or will it be enough to achieve your objective.

    A shotgun is a brilliantly messy machine. It packs a wallop, it’s great for close range fighting, carries up to 8 rounds in the magazine, reloads quickly, and doesn’t require a great deal of skill to operate. Unfortunately, if your target is beyond 60 yards it simply isn’t an effective weapon.

    Two very different approaches for two very different set of circumstances. Each should be used as designed.

    I believe the sniper approach is probably best used in cases of low-volume high-margin sales with a big budget. Conversely, the shotgun method is well suited for higher-volume lower margin sales with budget constraints.

    Brian Keith

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