Women In Advertising: The 3% Conference

Women are still under-represented in many areas of the creative industry, but the problem is striking in advertising, where marketers are speaking mainly to female consumers, but only 3% of creative directors in advertising are women. Enter The 3% Conference, an event designed to address the issue of women in advertising and create change for the future of the industry.

The 3% Conference: A First-Ever Event for Female Creative Directors will be held in San Francisco on Sept. 27, 2012. Despite the fact that female consumers influence upwards of 70% of consumer spending, only 3% of advertising creative directors are women. This fact is often cited as the reason that over 90% of women surveyed feel marketers don’t understand them (Greenfield Online Survey). In a world where ad dollars have to work harder than ever, brands know they cannot woo the gatekeepers of $4.3 trillion of spending using messaging crafted – or green-lighted – almost solely by men.

Speakers include:

·         Jennifer Siebel Newsom, Writer, Director, Producer, Miss Representation
·         Cindy Gallop, founder and CEO of IfWeRantheWorld
·         Barbara Lippert, Long-time Ad Critic, Adweek
·         Will Burns, Founder and CEO of Ideasicle
·         Christine Bronstein, Founder of A Band of Wives
·         Ale Lariu, CEO of Shout and co-founder of SheSays
·         Margaret Johnson, Executive Creative Director/Associate Partner, Goodby Silverstein
·         Cynthia Maller, Global Creative Director, PayPal
·         Christie Cordes, Founder + Owner, Ad Recruiter
·         Paige Grossman, Creative Director, Riney
·         Kari Niles, Creative Director, Razorfish
·         Mary Alderete, VP Global Brand Marketing, Levi’s
·         Jean Grow, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Marquette University

For more advertising resources, visit My Design Shop.

women of design bookWomen of Design by Armin Vit and Bryony Gomez-Palacio

Sale Price: $5.99

The immense body of work produced by graphic designers around the world is astoundingly varied, rich and widely celebrated. Yet in publications, conferences, judging panels and other public realms, women designers tend to be outnumbered by their men counterparts whose appearances, work and achievements are constantly in the spotlight—luckily, it’s a reversing trend. While Women of Design does not attempt to relieve the imbalance, it does bring full attention to the wonderful work, careers, and contributions of women designers, writers, teachers and entrepreneurs around the world.

 

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