Helping Clients Stay Competitive

In last week’s Marketing Monday post, I shared some resources to help you support your clients’ marketing efforts.

Today, I have more on this from Cameron Foote, Editor of Creative Business. In his August newsletter, he shares some advice on “Helping Clients Stay Competitive in Downturns.” Here is an excerpt:

Cutting back on expenses when income is down is a logical response in any client. But where and how it’s done can make a big difference in their future business. The following provides some thoughts on the right way to go about cutting back, presented in a letter format.

Dear Client:
We needn’t tell you that business today isn’t what it used to be. And we don’t want to be presumptuous or oversell our ability to help make things better (or at least keep them from getting worse). But our marketing communications expertise, [including having been through similar conditions before,] gives us a perspective we’d like to share. Yes, our perspective is selfserving. Nonetheless, we think you’ll find it well worth your consideration…

Maintain visibility.
There are three related points that have greater significance during business downturns.

The first is that customers forget just as rapidly now as at any other time. Without constant reminders, they will fail to remember an organization, or its products and their features. And the cost of reestablishing awareness later is high. Simply, it is less expensive to maintain awareness than create it all over again.

The second point is that awareness is enhanced when materials are consistent in style and message. So any modifications in strategy and tactics must retain the same family appearance. This is not the time for a change in positioning.

The third is that when activity falls below a certain level (the customer awareness threshold) the return on investment is so low as to not be worth the effort. No activity should ever fall to this level.

This article also covers these suggestions for clients:
o    Pare expenses, spare investments.
o    Re-think strategies and tactics.
o    Learn from history.

Jam-packed with insightful information, this edition of the newsletter also covers these topics:
o    Reinforcing A Firm’s Professional Distinctiveness
o    Helping Clients Stay Competitive In Downturns
o    How (Your Firm) Defines Value-Oriented Design
o    Why Professional Copy Is More Than Worth The Cost
o    Using Illustration For Differentiation & Impact
o    Explaining What Makes Internet Marketing Different

Use the Marketing Mentor Partner discount when you subscribe to the Creative Business newsletter here. (It only costs $129/year PDF), and includes unlimited free advice (phone + email) from Cameron Foote.

Want to “grill the pricing experts”? Join me, Cameron Foote and Emily Ruth Cohen for the Function Fox pricing panel on Sept 20.  Sign up (and submit your questions) here.

 

Marketing Monday: Helping Clients Stay Competitive

Last week, I shared some resources to help you support your clients’ marketing efforts. (http://www.creativefreelancerblog.com/designers/marketing-monday-marketing-101-resources/)

Also, in the comments, Laurel Black shared Digital Tonto. (http://www.digitaltonto.com/)

Today, I have more on this from Cameron Foote, Editor of Creative Business. In his August edition of the Creative Business Newsletter, he shares some advice on “Helping Clients Stay Competitive in Downturns.” Here is an excerpt:

Cutting back on expenses when income is down is a logical response in any client. But where and how it’s done can make a big difference in their future business. The following provides some thoughts on the right way to go about cutting back, presented in a letter format.

Dear client:

We needn’t tell you that business today isn’t what it used to be. And we don’t want to be presumptuous or oversell our ability to help make things better (or at least keep them from getting worse). But our marketing communications expertise, [including having been through similar conditions before,] gives us a perspective we’d like to share. Yes, our perspective is selfserving. Nonetheless, we think you’ll find it well worth your consideration…

Maintain visibility.

There are three related points that have greater significance during business downturns.

The first is that customers forget just as rapidly now as at any other time. Without constant reminders, they will fail to remember an organization, or its products and their features. And the cost of reestablishing awareness later is high. Simply, it is less expensive to maintain awareness than create it all over again.

The second point is that awareness is enhanced when materials are consistent in style

and message. So any modifications in strategy and tactics must retain the same family appearance. This is not the time for a change in positioning.

The third is that when activity falls below a certain level (the customer awareness threshold) the return on investment is so low as to not be worth the effort. No activity should ever fall to this level.

This article also covers these suggestions for clients:

  • Pare expenses, spare investments.
  • Re-think strategies and tactics.
  • Learn from history.

Jam-packed with insightful information, this edition also covers these topics:

  • Reinforcing A Firm’s Professional Distinctiveness
  • Helping Clients Stay Competitive In Downturns
  • How (Your Firm) Defines Value-Oriented Design
  • Why Professional Copy Is More Than Worth The Cost
  • Using Illustration For Differentiation & Impact
  • Explaining What Makes Internet Marketing Different

Use the Marketing Mentor Partner discount when you subscribe to the Creative Business newsletter here. (It only costs $129/year PDF or $139/year Print, and includes unlimited free advice (phone + email) from Cameron Foote.

Want to “grill the pricing experts”? Join me, Cameron Foote and Emily Ruth Cohen for the Function Fox pricing panel on Sept 20. http://www.functionfox.com/newsletter/2011.08/

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